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Publication Title | DIGITAL NOMADS: EMPLOYMENT IN THE ONLINE GIG ECONOMY

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DIGITAL NOMADS 9
managers, business owners, or in sales. Three were computer pro- grammers. Three were professors. Three were medical doctors, including one anesthesiologist. Three worked in finance: banking, accounting, and foreign exchange. Three held trade work: sheet- metal, electrician, and plumber. Four worked in the service indus- try. One was a teacher. Four served in the military. The partici- pants gained socio-economic privileges from their parents’ educa- tion and occupational background and parents were often the source of material and cultural capital resources.
MILLENNIALS’ GENERATION SOCIO-ECONOMIC OVER- VIEW
In the United States
Moos, Pfeiffer and Viinodrai (2018) contextualize the millen- nial age-cohort in relation to how policy and urban-planning can best meet the needs of this upcoming generation. Millennials are the most highly-educated generation in the U.S. at 38 per cent (Fry 2018: 54). The exponentially rising tuition costs has put this generation into student loan debt like no other (Geobey 2018: 132). The youngest three cohorts in 2012 had an average debt-to- asset ratio above 100 (Fry 2018: 58). They enter a neoliberal job market rapidly shedding benefits: health care, pensions, sick days, seniority, and security (Vinodrai 2018: 46). Worth (2018) exam- ines intergenerational transfer of wealth from parents to children in the form of money – tuition payments, subsidized living ex- penses, cars, bills paid, and down payment for houses. This famil- ial subsidy further exasperates inequalities by raising the prices of housing and other material goods. Mawhorter (2018) looks at “boomerang kids” who are able to move back in with their par- ents in order to eliminate their rental expenses completely. This fit with the complimentary shift in either not marrying, or marrying much later, perhaps once they are more financially established. Living with parents offers a significant savings, as Millennials were paying a large portion of their relatively small incomes towards rents; for those without a college degree, they were often paying half of their income towards rent (Mawhorter 2018: 207). While a college degree does not guarantee employment, not having a de-
ISSN 2283-7949
GLOCALISM: JOURNAL OF CULTURE, POLITICS AND INNOVATION 2018, 1, DOI: 10.12893/gjcpi.2018.1.11
Published online by “Globus et Locus” at www.glocalismjournal.net
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